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ATTENTION ALL PERSONS

IMPORTANT DATA : FOR YOUR REVIEW - POSTED MARCH 2007 AND SEE A FEW UPDATED (2008) COMMENTS ON THE 'HOME' PAGE

 

ASK YOUR DOCTOR: WHAT DOSE OF VITAMIN D SHOULD YOU BE TAKING?

INFORMATION ABOUT VITAMIN D

Dr. Laura Tosi, an orthopedic surgeon at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, D.C. said: “The current standard for vitamin D is not adequate,” … and predicted it would soon be raised to perhaps 1,000 International Units a day. Vitamin supplements are crucial, because adequate amounts of vitamin D cannot be absorbed through diet and sunshine alone.” This comment appeared at the end of an article by Jane E. Brody To Avoid ‘Boomeritis,’ Exercise, Exercise, Exercise” published in the New York Times, December 19, 2006

 As far back as 2004 the problem of an inadequate intake of Vitamin D was already highlighted in a review by Catherine Meyer, MD that appeared in the Journal of the American Medical Association  (JAMA September 22/29, 2004—Vol 292, No. 12 pp 1416-1418) and the following are quotes from that article.

“Scientists Probe Role of Vitamin D

Deficiency a Significant Problem, Experts Say”

“Interest in vitamin D deficiency, says Robert P. Heaney of Creighton University in Omaha, has become “greater virtually every week, in part because of the increasing number of publications implicating vitamin D deficiency in so many disorders.

“Reinhold Vieth, PhD, a biochemist specializing in vitamin D research at the University of Toronto, Ontario, pre­dicts that in the future, the adult recommended daily intake of vitamin D will exceed 1000 IU/d (>25 µg/d).”

“For now, the evidence of RCTs [randomized controlled trials] points to a need for at least 800 IU (20 µg) per day, and a [calcidiol] blood level of 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L),” he said.

A concern has been that higher intakes of vitamin D may be toxic, but most researchers say that the current recommendation is extremely conservative and far from levels that might be cause for concern. According to Vieth, 10 times the 400 IU/d dose provided by a multivitamin or even more would be safe for most individuals.

 “COMMENTARY: Both Heaney and Vieth said that based on recent research findings, they have boosted their own vitamin D in­ take to levels exceeding the current recommended intake levels (400 IU/d) supplied by an ordinary multivitamin. If the Food and Nutrition Board decides to revise current vitamin D in­take guidelines, they are likely to have a lot of company”


INFORMATION ABOUT THE SHINGLES VACCINE and WHY LYMPHOMA PATIENTS PROBABLY SHOULDN'T TAKE IT UNTIL MORE DATA IN IMMUNE COMPROMISED PERSONS IS STUDIED

Even though Zostavax appears to be very valuable for older persons...in general... it is currently contraindicated in patients with a history of lymphoma.

In 2005 in a study reported in the New England Journal of Medicine Volume 352:2271-2284 June 2, 2005 Number 22 A Vaccine to Prevent Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia in Older Adults M.N. Oxman, M.D., et al for the Shingles Prevention Study Group reported: “The use of the zoster vaccine reduced the burden of illness due to herpes zoster by 61.1 percent (P<0.001), reduced the incidence of postherpetic neuralgia by 66.5 percent (P<0.001), and reduced the incidence of herpes zoster by 51.3 percent (P<0.001). Reactions at the injection site were more frequent among vaccine recipients but were generally mild.

“Conclusions The zoster vaccine markedly reduced morbidity from herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia among older adults.”

 

2006: Subsequently the FDA Licensed this new vaccine to reduce older americans' risk of shingles (Herpes Zoster). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed Zostavax, on May 25, 2006, a new vaccine to reduce the risk of shingles (herpes zoster) for use in people 60 years of age and older.

 

HOWEVER… PLEASE NOTE: ZOSTAVAX is contra-indicated in persons with a history of primary or acquired immunodeficiency states including leukemia; lymphomas of any type, or other malignant neoplasms affecting the bone marrow or lymphatic system; or AIDS or other clinical manifestations of infection with human immunodeficiency viruses